Ages

Tahquamenon Falls

41382 West M-123
Paradise, MI 49768
Phone (906) 492-3415

Website

This majestic park is close to 50,000 acres and covers about 13 miles. It is home to many different animals that you may even spot as you are watching the falls. These animals include bear, moose, fox, eagles, and much much more!! Tahquamenon Falls is the second biggest east of the Mississippi River, Niagara being the first.

The Park

There are many things do to inside the park depending which season it is. In spring and summer, most activities include hiking, biking, fishing, bird watching, sightseeing, and camping. The fall season is picturesque. The color change among the trees creates the perfect scenery for photography. Come winter time, you can enjoy cross-country skiing, snowshoeing and snowmobiling. If you enjoy the idea of hiking take the four-mile trail down to the lower falls. The lower falls consist of little, less dramatic falls that flow around an island.

Also, at the park, there is a restaurant, gift shop, and their very own brewery and pub in one building. Open year around but close in late fall and early spring. Please feel free to call ahead of these hours (906) 492-3415.
The Camp 33 Gift Shop has everything from apparel to handcrafted goods to locally made jewelry. The restaurant is known for having delicious, locally caught, whitefish from Lake Superior. The pub contains their own variety of micro-brewed beers that come right from the pub.

Upper Fall

The Tahquamenon Upper Fall is over 200 feet wide and drops nearly 50 feet into the Tahquamenon River. From the parking lot, there is a walkway that comes to a platform at the crest of the fall. Two of its’ biggest trademarks are the rustic color it has and the amount of foam it produces. The water is brown not because of rust or mud but because of the tannic acid leached from cedar, spruce, and hemlock trees in the swamps drained by the river. The fall produces so much foam because of how soft the water is and that at capacity it flows over near 50,000 gallons of water per second.